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Theology

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Forty years ago, Jesuit Father Arij Roest Crollius wrote: “What is so new about inculturation?”[1] His reflection was a milestone in the understanding of that word and in welcoming a concept at the heart of the theological-pastoral language of the Second Vatican Council. Today, we pose a similar question in light of the impulse that… Read the full article

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Ian Graeme Barbour (1923-2013) was someone rather rare: a physicist and a theologian. Born in Beijing, in the course of his studies in Chicago he was the assistant of Enrico Fermi and, after graduating in physics, he began work as a physicist at Kalamazoo College in Michigan. He later applied himself to the study of… Read the full article

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On February 22, 2018, the prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Archbishop Luis Ladaria, published the letter Placuit Deo (PD) on some aspects of Christian salvation. It is addressed to the bishops of the Catholic Church.[1] This letter was made all the more important by the subsequent publication on April 9,… Read the full article

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From the month of February 2018, together with the names of the Jesuits who are part of our College of Writers (the editorial board of the journal), the inside cover will also list some “correspondents” and “contributing editors.” Of the 195 articles published during 2017, over 70 were written specifically for our journal by some… Read the full article

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Rod Dreher’s The Benedict Option was recently published in the United States and has caused much debate.[1] Its title refers to St. Benedict of Nursia (circa 480-547), and it has been defined as “the most discussed and most important religious book of the decade.”[2] It tries to posit a way for faithful Christians and their… Read the full article

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God and the assembly: the surprise of speaking the same language The Second Vatican Council’s Constitution Sacrosanctum Concilium proclaimed a “great principle” in article 36, recognizing the right of each liturgical assembly to pray to God in its own language. Historians remind us that the problem of liturgical language had already been faced and successfully… Read the full article

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Unlike Islam, Buddhism presents itself to the public in a subtler way. In fact, in an age characterized by activism and feverish agitation, Buddhism offers an alternative way to people on a religious quest. Throughout wide areas of public life, the invitation to silence and meditation is no longer connected to the Christian Church. In… Read the full article

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The philosopher Michel Foucault defines parrhesia as “the frankness, the openness of heart, the opening of word, the openness of language, the freedom of speech.”[1] However, this does not mean saying what one wants in the way one wants, for by its very nature parrhesia reflects an ethical attitude in that what one has to… Read the full article

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