(0)             
banner_lcc
mobile_lcc
1
‘CRISIS’ THE KEY WORD FOR THE REFORM OF THE CHURCH
1
PURCHASE YOUR COPY AT USD 9.95
Published Date : 2021-02-15
Download in PDF
Download in e-Pub

‘From Generation to Generation’: History in perspective from the Bible to Pope Francis


By: Jean-Pierre Sonnet, SJ

Sit with me at one table / The same for ancestor and grandson / The future is being accomplished now [….] And even now, in these coming times / I stand up in the stirrups like a child. (Arseny Tarkovsky, “Life Life”) Biblical faith is based on experience of God in history, although biblical Hebrew, paradoxically, does not have a word to designate “history,” the course of events that is progressively studied and written down. The language of the Bible...


Read More

Fragile: A new imagery of progress


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

Imagination, the engine of history Imagination is a theme that, in the course of recent decades, has become more and more the object of discussion, not only in literary and artistic terms, but also in historiographic, scientific and interpretative ones, since it is considered as the true driving force of the journey of humanity. This is the theme addressed in a powerful new book by Francesco Monico.[1] The author picks up on Jonathan Gottschall’s research on storytelling, in which the...


Read More

The Strength of Being Authentic: Reflections on culture and faith


By: Eugenio Rivas, SJ

The best description of today’s cultural reality is through “authenticity,” so says Charles Taylor, one of the most important contemporary Catholic intellectuals.[1] There exists a true “culture of authenticity.” By this term the philosopher means the search for personal self-fulfillment supported by the subjective principle of being faithful to what one sincerely feels. Behind this quest stands the moral ideal of “being true to oneself.” This ideal, Taylor asserts, is not to be defined according to what we desire or...


Read More

The Spiritual Memoirs of Peter Faber, SJ


By: Miguel Ángel Fiorito, SJ

We present a classic of the spirituality of the Society of Jesus: Peter Faber’s Spiritual Memoirs, commonly known as his Memoriale, or, to give it its full title, The Memoir of some good desires and good thoughts of Father Master Peter Faber.[1] The external man At the time of origin of the Society of Jesus, Peter Faber was the first “companion” of St. Ignatius of Loyola (i.e., the first who was called to the idea and convinced by it) and...


Read More

Between Loneliness and Company: Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Letter to You’


By: Claudio Zonta SJ

After the one-man theater tour Springsteen on Broadway (2018) and the studio album Western Stars (2019), Bruce Springsteen returned to the studio to record a musical work that is as complex as it is immediate, called Letter to You (2020). Observing the genesis of this album, we can see how it is full of strong dynamic tensions with elements that could be considered in tension or contradictory. In fact, in the era of large productions and myriad technological possibilities, in...


Read More

The Musical Journey of Jordi Savall


By: Luigi Territo, SJ

Jordi Savall is one of the most important contemporary viola da gamba players, a conductor and musicologist. Above all he is an itinerant musician, philologist and complete artist. His journeys furrow the paths of history, rediscovering obscure scores and forgotten musical instruments to let ancient sounds re-emerge from the past causing that fascination only great art can inspire. Like many of his colleagues, Savall began his musical studies when he was very young. By the age of six he was...


Read More

Internet and Democracy: Trump’s case and the consequences 


By: Antonio Spadaro, SJ

On January 20, 2021, Joe Biden was sworn into office as the 46th President of the United States of America and began moving into the White House. The transition of power from his predecessor was anything but easy. On January 6, supporters of Donald Trump had stormed Capitol Hill after he had incited his backers, especially his 88 million followers on Twitter, to take back victory, which he said had been “stolen.” Shortly after, on January 8, Twitter’s board of...


Read More

Beyond the Apocalypse: Starting again from Baghdad


By: Antonio Spadaro, SJ

Accepting the invitation from Baghdad and the local Catholic Church, Pope Francis will make an Apostolic Journey to Iraq from March 5 to 8, 2021, visiting Baghdad, on the plain of Ur, which is linked to the memory of Abraham, the city of Erbil, as well as Mosul and Qaraqosh on the plain of Nineveh. Matteo Bruni, director of the Holy See Press Office, announced this much-desired trip by Francis on December 7. He added that the program of the...


Read More

‘Enola Holmes’: Mystery sleuthing in the #MeToo era


By: Marco Piaia, SJ

Enola Holmes is a contemporary take on the detective universe created by Conan Doyle. Based on a series of novels by Nancy Springer, it combines a British setting with plot and characters imbued with the spirit of the United States. Amidst Victorian teapots and clothes, there are invitations to personal independence and to build one’s own dreams beyond ordinary expectations. Clearly conceived to focus on the dynamics of youth, the film is interesting in that it deals with a theme...


Read More

The McCarrick Report: Seeking the truth in order to convert


By: Federico Lombardi, SJ

On November 10, 2020, the “Report on the Holy See’s Institutional Knowledge and Decision-Making Related to Former Cardinal Theodore Edgar McCarrick” was made public in both Italian and English.[1] It had been compiled over the course of two years by the Secretariat of State at the behest of the Holy Father Pope Francis. Many have wondered if it was necessary to make public via internet such a voluminous and detailed document (449 pages, with 1,410 notes). It makes for painful...


Read More

Towards a Synodal Church


By: Cardinal Michael Czerny, SJ

When we apply the term “synodality” to the Church, we do not intend to designate a more collaborative decision-making process that merely leads to choosing an option, deliberating on  a measure, or issuing an instruction. Rather, it is something that makes clear a fundamental aspect of ecclesial identity: its primary communal dimension, its essential evangelizing mission under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. As an event of communion that originates in the mystery of the one and triune God, the...


Read More

‘The Great Wave’: The struggle between humans and nature


By: Claudio Zonta SJ

The Great Wave of Kanagawa, by Katsushika Hokusai, is one of the most famous Japanese works of art. It served as inspiration for Van Gogh’s Starry Night and Debussy’s orchestral work La Mer. It is a woodcut from 1830, belonging to a larger series, as evidenced by the title in Japanese, Thirty-six views of Mount Fuji / off Kanagawa / under a wave. The work was printed in multiple copies, which are in the Library of Congress of the United...


Read More

Ethiopia and the Conflict in Tigray


By: Giovanni Sale, SJ

The government in Addis Ababa views what took place in November 2020 in its rebel province of Tigray as a simple police operation in the north of the country on the disputed border with Eritrea and Sudan. In reality, the clash between the Ethiopian Army and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) was a real civil war. Fighter planes, armored vehicles and thousands of soldiers were deployed. Both sides fought with determination. It seems that the conflict caused more than...


Read More

The Complete Works of Karl Rahner


By: Andreas R. Batlogg, SJ

“Rahner is dead, and soon his thought will also be buried.”[1] The first part of the sentence we quote is an observation, the second an error. This drastic judgment was expressed in a letter by Hans Urs von Balthasar to the editor of a magazine on the occasion of the death of the Jesuit theologian Karl Rahner (1904-84). Von Balthasar was a friend of Rahner, and he too had been a Jesuit from 1929 to 1950, but the paths of...


Read More

‘Crisis’: The key word for the reform of the Church


By: Antonio Spadaro, SJ

If there is one word that sums up in a nutshell what the world is experiencing, it is “crisis.” In his Christmas greetings speech to the Roman Curia, Pope Francis employed it no fewer than 46 times. “This Christmas,” he said, “is the Christmas of the pandemic, of the health, social, economic and even ecclesial crisis that has indiscriminately stricken the whole world. The crisis is no longer a commonplace of conversations and of the intellectual establishment; it has become...


Read More

Authors of this Series
banner_lcc
mobile_lcc