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JOSEPH LOVED JESUS WITH A FATHER’S HEART
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Published Date : 2021-05-19
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Popular Religiosity in the Dialogue Between Faith and Culture


By: Daniel Cuesta Gómez, SJ

Popular religiosity: faith or culture? Some time ago, a Jesuit, who at that time was working with a parish in a working-class neighborhood, confided to us his concern about the drastic decrease in the number of faithful attending celebrations, catechesis and parish activities. In contrast, he noted the enormous number of people who, gathered by the confraternity of the neighborhood, filled the parish on the occasion of its celebrations and, above all, flocked en masse whenever it carried its images...


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Bad Tales


By: Mariano Iacobellis, SJ

After their great debut with La terra dell’abbastanza (Boys Cry, 2018), the brothers Damiano and Fabio D’Innocenzo have produced a film that deserves all the awards it has received, including five Nastri d’argento, and a prize at the Berlin Film Festival. The brothers describe Favolacce (Bad Tales), as a contrast to the realism of their first work, a sort of black fable in which, through the voice of a narrator, they portray the pneumatic vacuum of the parental figures (with...


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Mary Magdalene and the Resurrection in the Gospel of Luke


By: Marc Rastoin, SJ

Mary Magdalene is a key figure in early Christianity. Present in the four Gospels, she occupies a unique position, being a privileged witness to the resurrection. The East loves to call her “apostle of the apostles.” Tradition very quickly made her, especially after the fourth century, a sinner and a prostitute, identifying her with anonymous women in the Gospels, such as the forgiven sinner of Luke 7:36-50. But nothing in the Gospels supports such an identification. So, what do we...


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The Hope of Corie Mattie


By: Claudio Zonta SJ

American street artist Corie Mattie is better known as the “LA Hope Dealer.” She uses the street and walls as frames for her art, which is a communication of meaning and a reflection on the ethical principles of respect and tolerance. Born on the East Coast of the United States, she moved to Los Angeles. Returning east to study at the University of Maryland, Corie later finishing her education with a master’s degree at Georgetown University. She says about her...


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Salvation and the Jews


By: David Neuhaus, SJ

In Jesus’ exchange with the Samaritan woman in the Gospel of John, he tells her: “salvation is from the Jews” (John 4:22). The Church affirms that Christ’s rootedness in the Jewish people signifies that salvation indeed has come from the Jews. The teaching of the Second Vatican Council on the Jewish people and the successive teaching in article 4 of the Declaration Nostra Aetate (NA)[1] insists that the relationship with the Jewish people, the constant reference to the Scriptures of...


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Before the Coffee Gets Cold


By: Diego Mattei, SJ

If we could travel through time, to what period would we choose to return? Japanese writer Toshikazu Kawaguchi poses this and other questions in his novel Before the Coffee Gets Cold. It tells a very enjoyable story that takes place entirely inside a tiny café in Tokyo, which holds a secret: the chance to travel through time. A few ironclad rules determine the conditions of the journey. The first is in some ways the most discouraging, namely, that the present...


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Repaying the Ecological Debt: Pope Francis writes to the IMF and World Bank


By: Fernando de la Iglesia Viguiristi SJ

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank are two sister institutions created in 1944 by the Bretton Woods Agreements. The Fund was established to support the international financial system, granting conditional credits to countries experiencing temporary difficulties with their balance of payments. The World Bank, meanwhile, by financing investment projects vital to the development of poor countries on very advantageous terms, is at the forefront of global efforts to end extreme poverty, promote shared prosperity, and foster sustainable...


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The Bible as a Cultural Gift: Four words for today


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

Father Timothy Radcliffe, who was Master General of the Dominicans, has presented the relationship between faith and culture in these terms: “I grew up in a Catholic subculture that interpreted existence and the world in terms of gratitude and blessing. We believed in a God who heard our prayers, who loved us, and who at the hour of our death would let us go to heaven [...]. We had a host of friends who were neither Catholic nor Christian, but...


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Populism and Terrorism, the Illegitimate Heirs of Nihilism


By: Álvaro Lobo Arranz, SJ

The 21st century is no longer a child. However young it may still seem to us, the global events that we have lived through have already made this century as dramatic as the last one. Probably in the annals of history its beginnings will be remembered for the global challenges that characterized them, such as the economic crisis, climate change and Covid-19. If we look back, we can see two endemic evils that our democracies have suffered from and that...


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The Future of the Parish: Pastoral Conversion to the Gospel


By: Giancarlo Pani SJ

Pope Francis has dwelt at length on the “pastoral conversion” of the parish. In Evangelii Gaudium (EG), quoting Vatican II, he wrote, “‘Every renewal of the Church essentially consists in an increase of fidelity to her own calling […] Christ summons the Church as she goes her pilgrim way… to that continual reformation of which she always has need, in so far as she is a human institution here on earth’ (Unitatis Redintegratio, 6). [...] I dream of a ‘missionary...


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The Gospel Beyond Idle Gossip: Pope Francis’ Dante


By: Antonio Spadaro, SJ

As provincial of the Argentine Jesuits, Pope Francis asked his confreres to allow themselves to be “founded” in the Lord to avoid being “led astray” by other ideas and doctrines that do not build up but rather “undo the solid foundation of a priestly heart: doctrines that do not nourish God’s faithful people. Dante’s reflections here remain relevant today.” The then-Father Bergoglio next quoted Dante’s Canto XXIX of Paradise (109-114): “Christ did not to his first disciples say, / ‘Go forth,...


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Xu Guangqi: A great Chinese Catholic at the service of his people and his country


By: Federico Lombardi, SJ

One of the districts of the great metropolis of Shanghai, bustling with life and dense with skyscrapers, is called Xujiahui (or, in other script, Zikawei). At the crossroads of the main streets are perfectly manicured bulletin boards with a plan of the district and an explanation of its name (“Property of the Xu family at the junction of two rivers”) and the places of historical interest. At the edge of a major artery, one comes across a powerful modern bronze...


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Joseph loved Jesus with a Father’s Heart


By: Giancarlo Pani SJ

“With a father’s heart [...] Joseph loved Jesus”: so begins the Apostolic Letter Patris Corde, which commemorates 150 years since Pius IX proclaimed Saint Joseph “Patron of the Universal Church” on December 8, 1870, to emphasize “his central role in the history of salvation.”[1] Pope Francis speaks from “the abundance of his heart.” In this time of crisis and pandemic, our lives are sustained by ordinary people who do not appear in the headlines yet mark our lives: “Doctors, nurses,...


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In Memory of Fr. GianPaolo Salvini, SJ (1936-2021)


By: La Civiltà Cattolica

Father GianPaolo Salvini passed away on the morning of Sunday, March 21, 2021, at the Infirmary of the Jesuit Roman Houses due to complications of the blood cancer from which he had been suffering for some years . He had been the director of La Civiltà Cattolica for over 26 years – longer than any other director in the magazine’s 170 years – and had continued to make a valued contribution until his final months. Our debt to him is...


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Myanmar Steps Back into Darkness


By: Michael Kelly, SJ

Since the February 1 coup, the Tatmadaw – the official name of Myanmar’s armed forces – has escalated its crackdown on citizens protesting against the military takeover that ousted Myanmar’s democratically elected government. Unfortunately, this brutal reaction is only the latest in a series of repressive moves across Southeast Asia in recent years as political groups, backed by powerful militaries, intervene in government. Such dictatorships have arrested the growth of participatory democracies in countries close to Myanmar, including Thailand and Cambodia. The enduring authoritarian...


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