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PRUDENCE: A FORGOTTEN VIRTUE?
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Published Date : 2021-08-16
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Prudence: A forgotten virtue?


By: Giovanni Cucci, SJ

A forgotten heritage In today’s imagination prudence is mainly associated with careful, considered behavior (for example, driving a car slowly) or with a tendency to be indecisive so as to avoid risks, or worse, with a form of cowardice that prevents someone from taking a stand.[1] These views are largely associated with modern thought. In antiquity, however, prudence was considered the highest virtue and the guide of all the others (auriga virtutum), because it allowed people to recognize the fundamental...


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Maradona: ‘I will never be an ordinary man’


By: Claudio Zonta SJ

The journalist, sports writer and TV host Gianni Minà has reprised his earlier writing and interviews to produce a wide-ranging, impassioned and profound portrait of Diego Armando Maradona, marked by linguistic flair and wit in his biography, Maradona: ‘Non sarò mai un uomo comune’ Il calcio al tempo di Diego (Maradona: ‘I will never be an ordinary man’ Soccer in the age of Diego). Published by Minimum Fax, it tells the story of Maradona and his human side, full of...


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Back to the Olive Tree: Toward a Mediterranean theology


By: Jean-Pierre Sonnet, SJ

In his June 21, 2019, address in Naples, Pope Francis encouraged the elaboration of a Mediterranean theology. This theology, he specified, will bring into play “new narratives”: “There is a need for renewed and shared narratives that, starting from listening to the roots and the present, speak to the hearts of people, narratives in which it is possible to recognize oneself in a constructive, peaceful and hope-generating way.” This essay will sketch an outline of such a narrative, starting with...


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Veleno – ‘Poison’


By: Mariano Iacobellis, SJ

Veleno (Poison) is a docuseries based on the book by Pablo Trincia that traces the terrible events of the late 1990s in two Italian villages in the Bassa Modenese, which are separated by a few kilometers of fields, farmhouses and often banks of fog. Sixteen children were taken from their families and transferred to protected locations. The parents were suspected of belonging to a sect of Satanic pedophiles who carry out nocturnal rituals in cemeteries. The children told their stories...


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A More Loving and Lovable Church: Madeleine Delbrêl (1904–1964)


By: Diego Fares SJ

To write about Madeleine Delbrêl, Cardinal Martini said, is to write about “one of the greatest mystics of the 20th century.”[1] It was the same cardinal who said that “the Church is 200 years out of date. Why doesn’t it wake up? Are we afraid? Are we fearful rather than courageous?”[2] Yet when we read about Madeleine’s life we can affirm that in this daughter of the Church, in the testimony of  her life and her thought, the Church was...


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Dostoevsky: Theology from the frontier of experience


By: Stephan Lipke, SJ

Perhaps few experienced the restless 19th century as intensely as Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-81). His was a very strong experience of an era, his life full of personal misfortune. The artistic expression of what he lived through affected others as deeply as himself. When his debut epistolary novel Poor Folk (1846) was enthusiastically received by critics, the young mining engineer seemed destined to become a successful writer. However, his career was abruptly cut short in 1849 when he was imprisoned...


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Migrant Songs


By: Claudio Zonta SJ

The theme of migration has been part of the Italian popular music scene since the beginning of the 20th century, for example in songs such as Nebbi’ a la valle (Mist in the Valley), a traditional lament from Abruzzo about olive pickers in the Maiella area. This ballad was later recorded with the title Cade l’olivo (The Olive Falls) by Giovanna Marini and Domenico Modugno, and  became more famous as the hit Amara terra mia (Bitter Land of Mine). The...


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Pope Francis Speaks With Muslims: The trip to Iraq in context


By: Felix Körner, SJ

The significance, on a theological level, of Pope Francis’ trip to Iraq in March 2021 emerges clearly only when placed in the larger theological, historical and chronological context. First of all, bear in mind that the pope comes from the continent with the lowest percentage of Muslims, although Jorge Bergoglio’s homeland, Argentina, is the Latin American country where the largest portion of the Muslim population lives: about 400,000 people belong to Islam. That is a considerably larger number than, say,...


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The TV Series ‘BeTipul’ Healing Trauma


By: Marc Rastoin, SJ

In 2005, a series called BeTipul (In Therapy) appeared on Israeli cable tv. It has since been sold and adapted in many countries. The first to do so were the Americans at HBO in 2008, taking almost everything from the Israeli original.[1] In Italy, the series was broadcast on Sky in 2013 with a well-known cast and was well received by critics and audience alike. It is currently being telecast in France. The technical setup is extremely simple, almost elementary:...


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Cosmopolitics: Global common goods and new international institutions


By: Gaël Giraud, SJ

One indisputable lesson of the Covid-19 pandemic is that the only sensible response to such a phenomenon must be cooperative and universal. As long as there is even one country where the virus can multiply and mutate – no matter which country it is – it will keep coming back. We will be facing a pandemic that will recur over time, just like the flu. We will need new vaccines, perhaps every year, depending on how quickly the virus mutates....


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Osvaldo Pol: The Poetic Word has Dwellings of Flesh


By: Jorge Mario Bergoglio, SJ

Jesuit Father Osvaldo Pol, lifetime student and now professor, wrote almost all of these sonnets here in his home. Some have already been published, others appear for the first time. The Faculties of Philosophy and Theology are pleased to launch his book of sonnets. In poetic language he expresses theological wisdom, the fruit most appreciated by the Society of Jesus in its academic endeavors. It may seem paradoxical that a poet speaks of exiles from the earth in the language...


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Siberia: One country, many peoples


By: Vladimir Pachkov, SJ

If Russia is a country of extremes, Siberia is so to a greater extent. In Europe, Siberia is a byword for the freezing cold, but not everyone knows that much of Siberia is tropically hot in the summer. Siberia is a part of the world rich in fossil fuels, which, while helping to keep the global economy alive, also greatly contributes to pollution and climate change. At the same time, Siberia’s woodlands, along with its tropical forests, are the lungs...


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Crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo


By: Camille Mukoso, SJ

For almost 25 years, the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has continued to make headlines for the large number of civilian victims and refugees. Today, the province of North Kivu has become the powder keg of Central Africa, trapped by a regional system of conflicts that has made Congo “the rape capital of the world.”[1] The murders of human rights activists, journalists and opinion makers and, more recently, of Italian ambassador Luca Attanasio, are just some examples...


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